Debian logoDebian Screenshots >
font used to create the Ubuntu logo (2004‒2010)
This font was used to create the lettering of the Ubuntu logo, it was made available by Canonical under the OFL 1.1 and the GPL 2 with font exception to make rebranding of Ubuntu easier and to provide LoCos (Language communities) with a font to create material related to Ubuntu in their own language. . It is no longer used in the Ubuntu logo. It was in use between 2004 and 2010.
Freefont Serif, Sans and Mono OpenType fonts
Freefont is a set of free high-quality OpenType fonts covering the UCS character set. These fonts are similar to the widely known Helvetica, Times and Courier fonts.
The Tuffy Truetype Font Family
Thatcher Ulrich's first outline font design. He started with the goal of producing a neutral, readable sans-serif text font. There are lots of "expressive" fonts out there, but he wanted to start with something very plain and clean, something he might want to actually use.
metapackage to pull in Roboto fonts
Roboto is Google's signature family of fonts, the default font in Android and ChromeOS and the recommended font for Google's visual language, Material Design. . Roboto supports all Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek characters in Unicode 7.0 as well as currency symbol for the Georgian lari, to be published in Unicode 8.0.
Vera font family derivate with additional characters
DejaVu provides an expanded version of the Vera font family aiming for quality and broader Unicode coverage while retaining the original Vera style. DejaVu currently works towards conformance with the Multilingual European Standards (MES-1 and MES-2) for Unicode coverage. The DejaVu fonts provide serif, sans and monospaced variants. . This package only contains the sans, sans-bold, serif, serif-bold, mono and mono-bold variants. For additional variants, see the ttf-dejavu-extra package. . DejaVu fonts are intended for use on low-resolution devices (mainly computer screens) but can be used in printing as well.
monospaced font based on IBM 3270 terminals
This font is derived from the x3270 font, which, in turn, was translated from the one in Georgia Tech's 3270tool, which was itself hand-copied from a 3270 terminal. . While looking reasonably close to its bitmap ancestors, this is a vector font that looks good at any size. Its recommended use is, obviously, a text terminal, same as nearly half a century ago.